Not yet in Sweden, I promise

24 02 2013

“I grow up in Chicago, and there was always snow. In Los Angeles there never was, so we would always import snow!”

– David Hasselhoff

I woke up yesterday morning with the sound of the snow heavily falling outdoors and for a moment I thought I was already in Sweden. My mother suddenly appeared to take me back to reality and then I realized I may be still in Barcelona. So… What to do? This badly-timed cold front is too late for an influx of northern wildfowl, so the only effect it may have may be a noticeable sedimentation of early spring migrants.

Finally, I decided to visit the Llobregat Delta, a good place for both migrants and wildfowl. The firsts views of the landscape were pretty unusual, with the plain surrounded by white mountains. It was cold, but there was no wind, so the conditions were almost perfect to do some birding.

Image

There were quite a lot crag martins flying over the Cal Tet lagoon and, among them, my first house martin. A pied wagtail had been sighted a few hours before, but I didn’t manage to find it. Moreover, it was plenty of wildfowl: more than 80 red-crested pochards, 300 shovelers, gadwalls, some shelducks, hundreds of teals, mediterranean, black-headed, yellow-legged and an Audouin’s gull… but the best was this female ferruginous duck, a bird always nice to see.

Image

A greater spotted cuckoo (also my first this year) flushed at Cal Nani marshes did demonstrate that spring is already in the air. The bird showed well, sat on a fence for a while and later moved to the top of a blackberry bush.

Image

We don’t have much time left till the arrival of the bulk of swallows, willow warblers and subalpine warblers, but let’s see where do I am when this happens.





This is not a goodbye

20 02 2013
“When you are old and gray and full of sleep, and nodding by the fire, take down this book and slowly read, and dream of the soft look your eyes had once, and of their shadows deep.”
 – William Butler Yeats
El Hierro must be one of the best places to feel the sea as a part of you. Hence, these 2 weeks has been the best way to say goodbye to the sea, since I will be working with ground birds at Falsterbo for the next 3 months. We have had a taste of all: African heat haze, northern cold winds, rain, burning sun, fogg and of course the Canary Island’s typical trade winds. Fortunately, we managed to take profit of almost all the conditions we were coming across.
The first days were quite normal. The beaked whales (once again the target of the survey) seemed to be scarce, but the Mar de las Calmas bay was plenty of Spotted, Bottlenose, Common and Rough-toothed dolphins. Birds were also present since there is a Barbary falcon nest close to the land-based observation point and the local ospreys were also prospecting the area. The sea was infected of both pyrosomids and Portuguese Man o’war, as seems usual in the Canaries during early spring. We took the first underwater images.Image
After 3 days of normal work, a northern front was near to force us to suspend the campaign. We already had made our package when a last look at the forecast encouraged us to rest in el Hierro. Even it was impossible to go out the sea during the 2 following days, we profited to see the island once again. The idea was to show to the volunteers working on the survey almost all the local bird species and this would represent for me the chance to check if there was something new in the pond at Frontera. We first saw some Bolle’s pigeon in the high part of the forest, together with Tenerife goldcrest, Tenerife blue tit and the rest of common endemics. In the end, we reach the pond. A lesser scaup had been sighted there in late December but I didn’t expect to see it. The first bird I saw apart from some yellow-legged gulls was a new female ring-necked duck, but the female lesser scaup suddenly appeared. A quite typical image in the Macaronesia: two nearctic ducks together in the same pond.
Image
Image
Later on, already in the east coast of the island, we found a dead deep water fish of a still unknown species. Any comments on the identification will be welcome! Anyway, the landscapes from both here and El Verodal beach were stunning. I won’t never forget that dusk with Borja, Efrain, Manu, Nino, Crístel and Agus (even she had a cold) at the Orchilla lighthouse.
ImageImage
 Image
The following days were more normal. The bay was still plenty of dolphins, specially Rough-toothed Steno bredanensis. These smart animals were swimming simultaneously, in its unmistakable way. Most of the groups contained calves that were particularly actives, jumping and flapping the surface with the tail. In one of the groups, we notice there was a dead calf that appeared and disappeared intermittently. Finally, we saw what was presumably the mother of the calf taking the lifeless body an putting it downwards in an attempt to avoid gull’s attacks. The calf seemed to be dead since more or less 1 day ago, so the tenacity of the mother was remarkable.
ImageImageImageImage
Most of days, the Atlantic spotted dolphins overfill the bay. These animals are extremely social. They either come and jump below the prow or play with the bubbles of the engine. Together with them, a huge group of Short-finned pilot whales appeared just for one day but enough to get very good views. Perfect to try some aquatic pictures!
ImageImageImage
In the time being, the land-based station was surrounded by Boettger’s lizards Gallotia caesaris and Canary Island’ ravens, both doing some display. This stunning panoramic landscape (thank you Efrain) shows the place we were working at. Wonderful when weather conditions do respect.
31894_10200343011355366_309246238_nImageImage
And what about beaked whales? They insisted in their scarcity, but finally we managed to take good pictures of a group of 3 Cuvier’s beaked whales. It’s the first time I am able to notice its red eye in the middle of its friendly face. One of the animals passed diving just below the prow and both Borja and me enjoyed an unforgettable image of the whale wagging its tail impulsing the huge body into the depth. The same day we saw an impressive Bryde’s whale that was near to wet us with its blow.
ImageImage
Now it’s time to face Falsterbo. Probably I will miss the Canary Islands sometime, but I am sure I will come back sooner than expected. Meanwhile, I will remember them by reading my book.







%d bloggers like this: