Big words

14 03 2013

“People must feel that the natural world is important and valuable and beautiful and wonderful and an amazement and a pleasure.”

– David Attenborough

Surnia ulula blog

I don’t use to put a picture in the beginning of my posts, but that’s a special one. Today was the hawk owl day. All the other things were just to fill the rest of the time, what would ordinarily be big events, keeping in mind we were supposed to look also for bean goose, rough-legged buzzard and the beautiful landscape typical from the Swedish countryside. The day started with some ringing at the lighthouse. A flock of siskins, a blue tit and a treecreeper kept us entertained until the H hour of the D day, when Sophie finally took us to go to the hawk owl place. A bird had been seen for several weeks at Skrylle, a lovely (but crowded) place in central Skåne, and we got plenty of information from Ulrik, who had already seen that bird for 4 times. However, even we did a great effort, the bird did not appear. A marsh tit and some nuthatch were the best, apart from this ill-looking common buzzard.

Buteo buteo

We left the area having seen almost nothing and we must admit we were a bit disappointed. Anyway, we headed for Vombs Ängar, where many geese of different species were supposed to be. The first we saw as soon as we arrived was a trio of resident white storks, too lazy to migrate. Suddenly, a flock of bean geese appeared, but too faraway to enjoy them.  Some white-fronted geese did almost the same and, although the place looked nice for quite a lot of things, there was nothing but red kites. The day was being a crappy day since we had got poor views of the only interesting birds we had seen. After a quick recheck of the Swedish rare bird alert system, we headed towards Häckebergasjön, where another hawk owl had been reported 2 days ago. This bird had been seen only once and there was not pretty much information about it. However, it was our last chance to see this species so it was worth to try. Our luck changed in our way to this new place: we first spotted a rough-legged buzzard set in stick, and then there was a nice flock of geese just by the road. There were (of course) mainly greylag, but also at least 20 greater white-fronted and 5 bean geese. An adult red kite showing its broad black primary coverts was also welcomed.

Vombs Angar

Buteo lagopus

Anser albifrons

Milvus milvus

Finally, we reached Häckebergasjön (yeah, I’ve just copy/paste the name of the place…). The place looked just like a countryside may look, open areas surrounded by old forest: endangered high-quality landscapes. The hawk owl had been reported 900m from the road, so we started walking in that direction. Then, the track was divided into 2, so Stephen took the left one and Sophie and me took the right one. 10 minutes later, Stephen called us saying he had the owl. After some disorganized search, we finally spotted it again, sat on a stump, in the middle of a clearing, under the cloudy sky: I felt I had already dreamed about this image. We took our time to enjoy such a nice bird, aging it as a 2nd cal. year based upon its sharp tail feathers, with a white triangle in the tip. Each time the bird look at us, I got goosebumps.

place surnia ulula

Surnia ulula2

Surnia ulula3

To finish what suddenly turned into a very good day, we got this nice sunset from a still frozen North Sea.

hielo

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