Falsterbo Vice

7 04 2013

“In order to know virtue, we must acquaint ourselves with vice. Only then can we know the true measure of a man.”

– Marquis de Sade

We woke up today with the smell of Danish butter cookies. The western winds were quite strong, but the main advantage of this was the huge migration of ducks, swans and geese. After some quiet days, the migration showed its teeth today again with thousands of birds heading north in a stunning way. It was the turn for the swans, the scoters and the barnacle geese. These species seem to have replaced the eiders and the long-tailed ducks in the top positions of the migration counts… they are welcome! A special mention goes to a flock of 62 Bewick’s swan. I spotted the flock faraway from the shore and they seemed to be in a hurry. However, when they reached more or less my position, they turned right, getting closer to the coast, flying over me and finally heading NE. In these good days, it’s hard to stop seawatching in the end of the morning. I am totally addicted to migration but I don’t want to give up.

Cygnus bewickii3

Cygnus bewickii

Cygnus bewickii2

Each day, new species are arriving, little by little, as everything this spring. Yesterday I saw my first red-throated diver, today my firsts spotted redshank and marsh harrier. And what about passerines? Apart from the daylight migrants such as skylark, meadow pipit, reed bunting and white wagtail, there’s almost nothing. A single robin caught this morning after 5h of ringing and this is it. The first willow warbler is supposed to be here in 10 days, but we have not yet caught the first chiffchaff. Do you fancy betting?

Yesterday the sea was quiet, but encouraged by the interesting bewickii/columbianus intergrade that Stephen found the day before yesterday at Knosen (see a picture and a discussion on his blog), we cycled again to the northernmost point just to check that the swans were too faraway and the haze made the identification impossible. Nonetheless, loads of cranes were flying over, with a total account of 524 individuals. A single tundra bean goose also followed their steps.

Grus grus

Anser fabalis rossicus

The day before had not been such a good day for migration but for sedimentation. This female velvet scoter showed well near the harbor. It seemed it liked to swim against the waves. Its body seems to be designed for such purpose! Velvet scoters have always been one of my totemic species and now I can enjoy them everyday. This time there was a female in the harbor, but who knows if tomorrow there would be a male…

wave velvet scoter blog

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