Holidays

26 07 2013

“You asked me to dance
Said music was great for dancing
I don’t really dance much
But this time I did”

– Last days of disco, Yo la tengo

After a busy spring season in the field, I took a month for being at home, enjoying the city and the life out of the bubble. However, I got the time to do some birding/ringing/butterflying. Two days of ringing at Castelltallat mountains, in central Catalonia, were so useful to remember about some Mediterranean species. The species set had changed quite a lot since the last time I had ringed there. Instead of the big numbers of both Rock and Cirl buntings that I used to catch, now I got some forest species such as Western Bonelli’s warbler an the less exciting Blackcap and Short-toed tree-creeper. The place has in fact changed quite a lot. The area was burnt in 1998 and since then several new plant species have colonized in a typical vegetal succession sequence. The firsts Strawberry trees Arbutus unedo had already given way to some oak species and the former bush-land area is nowadays an actual forest. Fortunately, some opened areas had survived and there is still a notable density of Ortolan bunting among other interesting Mediterranean species such as Western black-eared wheatear, Rock sparrow, Blue rock thrush and Western orphean warbler. The formerly scarce Golden oriole is nowadays one of the commonest species in what could probably be treated as the paradigm of the overall change.

bonellii

Another Mediterranean species that seems to be increasing is the Subalpine warbler. The area is now the perfect habitat for the Subalpines: low Quercus in dry areas. I have to say this is one of my favorite species and I’d never get tired of ringing them, especially given the fact that the aging is never straightforward. This time I looked at the tail and tried to assess the age of every feather. Here it is my attempt on 2 birds (one 2cy male and one 2cy female):

Sylvia cantillans tail2

Sylvia cantillans tail

The presence of juvenile feathers is quite obvious in both cases, but the number of generations and the kind of moult that every feather comes from is not obvious at all. However, in my opinion, it’s possible to see the sometimes invisible differences between the first and the second pre-nuptial moults. Here you can see one of the males in all its splendour. Beautiful, isn’t it?

Sylvia cantillans

Another interesting bird I caught was this Nightjar. It’s an adult with a suspended moult: the 3 innermost primaries, the biggest alula and some secondaries are retained in what constitutes a good example of how the presence of 2 generations of feathers (even if there is not a pre-nuptial moult) doesn’t necessarily mean the bird is a 2cy. The pattern of the retained feathers is the same than the moulted ones and the differences are only due to wear. The high frequency of this suspended moult in this species makes me wonder what “suspended moult” means. Maybe we should consider this as a partial moult that both juvenile and adult birds can do. The individuals that do an actual complete are, in fact, an exception!

nightjar wing

The diversity of butterflies around the place where I set the nets was notable. The final list included some scarce species such as Marsh fritillary Euphydryas aurinia and Sloe hairstreak Satyrium acaciae. However, some meadows had been cropped and there were not many flowers. It could had been even better, but some places where plenty of Pyramid orchids Anacamptis pyramidalis, one of the commonest orchids in Catalan mountains.

Satyrium acaciae

Euphydryas aurinia

Anacamptis pyramidalis

Finally, I thought a visit to the Pyrenees targeting the always special Ptarmigans would be a good training session for the cold Sweden. It was really cold high in the mountains, with a strong snowfall and a freezing wind. We managed to see a male Ptarmigan doing some display. Quite stunning! Sadly, there were not many butterflies due to cold temperatures.

Lagopus muta

Lagopus muta2

Lagopus muta3

Now I am ready for another ringing season at Falsterbo. The “Foreign Team” (Stephen and me) and the Southern Gangsters (in alphabetical order: Emil, Oscar and Ulrik) will be ringing at Flommen reedbed until the end of September and then we will move to the lighthouse. The season looks promising: we are already 50 birds above the for-the-time average, we’ve already broken 1 day record (even it’s just the starling day record…) and we’ve already caught a rarity, this Savi’s warbler (yeah, another southern species…; © Stephen Menzie). I will sound like a twitcher, but I felt it was nice the species number 200 in my Swedish list was a rarity. Anyway, all of this in just 5 days of ringing; it looks promising but it’s still too early to take conclusions. Let’s see.

20130726_locluc_02

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