Tribute to Llobregat Delta

4 04 2014

“And did you exchange a walk on part in the war for a lead role in a cage?”

Wish you were here, Pink Floyd

 

2 springs of absence, justified or not, but Llobregat Delta forgives me with a very nice migration day, concluded with an Iberian chiffchaff that was so kind as to call enough times to be recorded. Iberian chiffchaff is a local rarity, but regular enough to expect to find one with a bit of effort in the typical areas. Fortunately, one of those areas used to be my local patch, and the place where I learnt most of what I know. Thanks to Joan Castelló, I grew up as a ringer and thanks to Xavi Larruy I did so as a birder. The list of people who has already appeared in my blog is starting to be long and it was not fair that these 2 were not yet mentioned. Maybe this post, that tries to be a homage to Llobregat Delta, is a good chance to say thank you. Don’t expect neither great photos nor crazy rarities; this is gonna be how it used to be some years ago: chasing warblers through the bushes and waiting for either a crake or a Temminck’s stint to appear behind the rushes.

Yeah, it’s been an emotional morning, with several re-encountered feelings and birds. After two days of strong showers coming straight from Africa (yesterday’s rain was disgustingly sandy), the tamarinds and reedbeds along the road that follows La Vidala chanel were packed with Willow warblers, Chiffchaffs, Blackcaps, Redstarts and Robins, whereas the sky was full of Swallows, Martins and Swifts. Although the rain has increased the water level of the marshes, the number of waders was still notable, as well as the diversity of duck species.

A walk through the bushes produced some personal first for the year: Bonelli’s and Subalpine warbler, Nightingale and Common redstart. The Bonelli’s warbler is a surprisingly scarce species at Llobregat Delta, despite being extremely abundant in the nearby mountains. I decided to stay for a while to ensure the identification. Tertials looked white-edged at a glance, but GCs were just normal. The bird called (as Western) more often than migrant Bonelli’s usually do, so I carried on without looking back.

bonelli

 

Already inside La Bassa dels Pollancres observatory, two photographers argued at loud about whatever expensive camera, so most of birds were faraway. I ended up checking the swifts, since it was possible to spot some Pallid just by bare eye. There was one that glimpsed my atention. Although obviously Pallid, it got a less extensive white bib, a deeper fork in the tail and a darker background coloration, contrasting with the diagnostic pale panels in GCs.

pallidus

pallidus2

 

All in all, it reminded me to the illyricus I did see at Copenhagen museum. This subspecies is meant to breed in the Adriatic see, at least in the east coast. Maybe not so surprisingly, it stroke me as being the most distinctive subspecies among the 3 I examined at the museum, mainly due to the characters I also spotted in today’s bird. In the photo below, you can see 3 illyricus in the right and 2 brehmorum in the left. What can I say? I just don’t know…

apus pallidus

Anyway, since the two photographers carried on with their senseless argument, I decided to move to the other observatory. As usual there were more birds, and some interesting ones. The Black-tailed godwit in bright breeding plumage below attracted my atention. I’m not used to them and, honestly, for me all of them look bright enough for islandica. This one it’s not, but it’s still one of the most stunning waders of our region, isn’t it?

limosa limosa

When I first entered the hyde, one of the 2 Collared pratincoles present was sat just in front, but, after 10 minutes, it decided to fly in front of the airport tower. Everybody who’s been at Llobregat Delta knows what this is: instead of an airport surrounded by meadows and marshes, nowadays is a marshland area surrounded by an airport. Photos like the one below can be taken with several species, some of them endangered, such as Bittern or Audouin’s gull. However, birds do resist and this post wants to be an evidence of it.

glareola2

glareola

 

Time to go! My body claimed for more passerines, but first I had to take a look at the orchids, a Llobregat Delta’ must-see from February to June. Early April is time for both Dark bee Ophrys fusca and Sawfly Ophrys tenthredinifera orchids. Is a bit late for the former, so I focused on the Sawflies. It’s been already 3 years without seeing them in their climax. I wouldn’t say I’ve missed them, but yeah, it’s been nice to see them again.

ophrys tenthredinifera

What I’ve really missed during these years is Iberian chiffchaffs. Maybe because it was one of the first identification challenges I dove into or maybe just because I like chiffchaffs, but the truth is that every march and april I’m looking for one of them, no matter where I am. Today I was in the right place, but it was not until one of the last trees I checked that I found what’s been the bird of the day. Among hundreds of phyllos, I spotted a bright green-yellow chiffchaff, with brownish legs, difused cheeks and half-green/half-pale supercilium.

ibericus2

That’s usually it for finding a putative Iberian, but then you need it to call because you need to record it. Today’s bird was cooperative and I managed to record the call. I’ve not edited it since I know my Swedish readers (if they are keen enough to reach this far down) would love to hear the Serin as well.

Click here

20140404_ibericus_llobregat

In the end, 81 species in 5 hours of birding in a really small area close to Barcelona. Although I am going to Israel next friday, back to the Canaries in a month and back to Sweden in July, Llobregat Delta will always be the first place to check the sightings from.

 

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5 04 2014

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