Back to the cradle

9 07 2012

“Sleep, oh sleep, my dearest boy./I will cradle you. I will guard you”

– Henrik Ibsen

Visiting Llobregat Delta always brings me a lot of good memories. The field where I saw a marsh sandpiper last year, the fields where I found a Rose-colored starling, the reeds where I ringed an Icterine warbler, an Iberian chiffchaff, another Iberian chiffchaff, some Moustached… The day of the 7 White-winged terns, the day of the Cream-colored courser, followed by the day of the Broad-billed sandpiper. All of that, concentrated in the Prat de Llobregat area, what means memories can be multiplied by 2 if we take the whole Delta.

Back in Barcelona, to visit the Llobregat was one of the first things I had to do. There was a Blue-winged teal but I didn’t care actually… I wanted just to be there and see what the Delta could offer to me. July is not the best season to enjoy migration but only by seeing the local species, I remembered what “diversity” means. Since I’ve returned to the continent and seen even the most common species, I realized how hard it must be to colonize an archipelago such as the Canaries.

Both dragonflies and butterflies are at their maximum, and I was able to see the rare (the UICN declared it “Vulnerable”) Mediterranean skipper Gegenes nostradamus. It’s neither beautiful nor colorful, but it’s enigmatic and hard to see… that’s enough.

I didn’t have too much time to look for dragonflies, but I saw 7 species at a glance. Blue-tailed damselflies Ischnura elegans were mating while keeping an eye on the Black-tailed skimmers Orthetrum cancellatum. I looked at that during only 10 minutes, but I saw at least 5 catches of damselflies by the powerful skimmers. The Violet dropwings Trithemis annulata seemed to be quieter, maybe enjoying the show played by others’ frenetic life.

And what about birds? I didn’t see the teal. I saw a nice female in April while I’ve not seen a Black-winged stilt since long time ago. However, the best was a singing male Savi’s warbler Locustella luscinioides at Calaixos de Depuració de Ca l’Arana, an irregular breeder at Llobregat Delta. I don’t know if we are already in the dispersive period, but the habitat is suitable for the species and the bird was singing.

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A Song to say Goodbye

7 07 2012

“Und die Vögel singen nicht mehr…”

– Ohne dicht, Rammstein

I am already in Barcelona again and I have in mind a post about this city (she deserves it) but I must talk about my last day in Tenerife, out in the field.

Natacha told me about a route from Los Silos to Monte del Agua, probably in my favorite place of the island (as I said before) and I could not imagine a better way to say goodbye to Tenerife. The route starts in a low bushland area and goes up entering the heart of the laurel forest. In the first part of the ascent, you pass beside some old typical Canary Islands constructions, surrounded by fruit trees and water courses. Some of that old houses are deserted and you feel obliged to think about the possibility of living there.

A few meters above, you cross an underground gallery built in the past times to transport water throw the mountains. When you exit the tunnel, everything is green, you heard the pigeon’s wings clapping in the trees and then you realize you are already in the laurel forest. Just when we leaved the gallery, we saw that Epaulet skimmer Orthetrum chrysostigma resting on the ground.

The whole trip was very nice. We were all the morning trying to identify as many plant species as possible. Sometimes we managed to do so, but some others were a bit more exasperating. Just as the butterfly Gonepteryx cleobule! I’ve been 5 months in Tenerife and it has been impossible to take a miserable picture of it. Some of them flew over us while consulting our plant field guide, one was even almost sat on a flower for a while, but it never stopped flying actually. Just another reason to come back.

One of the most stunning stages of the trip was the path surrounded by Isoplexis canariensis, a flower called “rooster-crest” by local people. This plant is pollinated by birds and therefore its whole structure is designed to attract birds and impregnate them with the pollen. The anthers are placed in the upper part of the flower, a part that birds can’t avoid to touch with the nape when sucking the nectar. Moreover, the color is in the orange wavelenght, like most of ornithophil plants.

It was also nice to see the Canaries madrone Arbutus canariensis without the bark, showing a stunning pinkish red trunk. There were many of them in what probably is their best area, as it is for many other localized plant species. The landscape was incredible and we decided to have lunch. Thank you Natacha for the sandwich and specially Esther for the honey!

In the way back, we saw some deserted houses again. As usually, walls were plenty of Tenerife lizards Gallotia galloti and we had to share the prickly pears we had collected since they seemed to be hungry.

Later on, already close to Los Silos, some dragonflies such as Red-veined dropwing Trithemis arteriosa fulfilled my thirst just enough to forget about wildlife for the rest of the day and enjoy a music festival at Buenavista del Norte. Esther defined the day as “perfect” and I couldn’t agree more.





The firsts dragonflies

27 03 2012

“Boredom is nothing but the experience of a paralysis of our productive powers.”

– Eric Fromm

A brief post from a brief birding time. I saw the first Emperor a week ago, but today there were several at Tejina, together with some Scarlet dragonflies. It doesn’t seem a good year for dragonflies in the Canaries. Most of the ponds are dry, reedbeds are brown and it’s still cold. However, it’s possible to enjoy even the commonest species.

Talking about birds, a part from a little bittern that only offered poor views, nothing new has reached the island since my last visit. Turtle doves are already singing, and maybe that’s the best we can look at.








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